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SHEPHERD THE FLOCK: How To Shepherd Your Flock In A Politically Charged World


Everything gets politicized these days. It’s never been easier for churches to also get caught up in waves

of political enthusiasm and social activism.So, what should a pastor do when their fellow church

members see needs and want to meet them, see injustice and want to stop it, or see a good cause and

want to support it?

First, we should rejoice! When a church does a good job equipping people to think and live as Christians in

a fallen world, the people become like rivers overflowing the banks of the church gathered (the lake). The

landscape changes when there are lakes and rivers. But not all lakes need to be rivers.

So what do you do when one person wants their passion to be the primary passion for the whole church?

There are no easy answers to this question because every church and every community and every activist

is a different mix of personalities and passions. But here are some principles to keep in mind.

1. Demote the political sphere while encouraging your politically active members.

For too many in our society, politics is everything. In This Is Our Time, I write about the politicization of everything, where politics has become a religion. Our country is still faith-filled; it is just that today our faith is misplaced. Too often, it’s directed toward government, not God. And many of our frustrations come when we realize government can’t ultimately save us. It was never meant to. Peggy Noonan writes: “When politics becomes a religion, then simple disagreements become apostasies, heresies. And you know what we do with heretics.”

All around us are people who believe the myth that politics is the only real place where you can effect

change or transform the world. When you think that laws are the most important factor in changing the

world, then every battle must be fought to the end. Otherwise, you’re sacrificing the cause!

The gospel challenges that myth. It tells us that the political sphere is just one area in which change can

take place. It helps us put the political in a broader context, to realize that it is not everything. All gains are

temporary, but so are all setbacks. Even if we lose a political cause, we can still be faithful. We are called

always to witness, not always to win.

With all of this in mind, pastors should demote politics to its proper place, while simultaneously

encouraging Christians who are active in their community. Understanding that the political sphere is not

ultimate does not mean we should retreat. We cannot be indifferent, hoping to enter our houses of

worship or our closets for prayer, as if holiness is all personal and private. No, the apostle Peter calls us

to holiness and honor as a way of being on mission in this world. “Holiness is not supposed to be cloaked

in the chambers of pious hearts,” says theologian Vince Bacote, “but displayed in the public domains of

home, school, culture, and politics.”

2. Be aware of how quickly the uniting factor of a congregation can become a cause rather than the cross.

Once you have demoted the political sphere to its proper place and encouraged your church members to

remain active, you should keep an eye on what is at the center of your preaching and teaching. It is easy

for the unifying factor of a church to become what we do for others instead of what Christ has done for us.

A church’s unity for a cause can eventually displace the cross. The gospel is still there, but it’s no longer

in the center. Something else is uniting the church – a political cause, social work, a community ministry.

Why does this matter? Because we want long-term fruitfulness in our communities.

When you put the gospel at the center, various ministry opportunities will come alongside as

demonstrations of the power of Christ’s work on the cross. But when you put a cause at the center,

various ministry opportunities may flourish for a time but then wither away, because they are no longer

connected to the source of life that can sustain such activism.

3. Guard the platform of your church.

As a pastor, you’ve probably received multiple self-invitations to take “just a few minutes” of precious

platform time to give a report or make a congregation aware of a need. Whether it’s people spreading

Bibles around the world, missionaries coming home from furlough, medical missionaries providing